Month: February 2017

How to make a Frankincense salve for health and beauty

Reblogged from sister blog, Apothecary’s Garden

Apothecary's Garden

We have relied on Frankincense resin for centuries to treat Arthritis, inflammation of joints, the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, pain, ulcers, asthma, bronchitis, coughs, and colds, cuts, and wounds. It is traditionally used to improve memory and brain function, as an aphrodisiac, sexual tonic and to address issues of infertility in both sexes. It is well-known for its cosmetic skin rejuvenating properties, adding elasticity to mature skin and reducing wrinkles. Lately, we have seen a slew of studies that indicate the Boswellic acids found in the resin portion of some Frankincense types possess anti-cancer properties.

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 Working with Frankincense

A Frankincense salve can be as simple as hot Olive oil infused with Frankincense thickened with a little beeswax in the Bain Marie. In fact, it has likely been prepared in exactly this fashion for centuries.

The type of oil you use is dictated by personal preferences and intended use, as is…

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The many benefits of Frankincense tea

Apothecary's Garden

A tea made with Frankincense resin is an ancient and widely accepted remedy in many cultures and traditional medical systems for a broad range of ailments. Some of these traditional uses have been researched recently to confirm or dismiss the therapeutic claims behind them, and I am surprised to see that many of the claims associated with Frankincense tea seem to be substantiated in the laboratory. I have listed a few here, but trust you to do your own research as well.

Our recent obsession with Frankincense essential oil and Boswellic acids, (which are not found in the essential oil of Frankincense), can easily blind us to the plethora of therapeutic compounds found in the whole oleo gum resin and is no doubt increasing the pressure we are putting on trees that are already over-harvested and over-burdened with our market demand for Frankincense essential oil.

The following gem is borrowed from a wise scientist…

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