Herbal Products

Boswellia Sacra/Carterii resin extract beneath B. Papyrifera resin extrac

Extracting the resin and Boswellic acids from Frankincense. A visual walkthrough.

 

Many of you have asked for clearer instructions on the method I use for separating the resin with its Boswellic acids from Frankincense in the post “Tapping into Frankincense and its Boswellic acids. An easy extraction method”.  I realize written descriptions leave a lot of room for interpretation and a video would be the best method of demonstration.

Since shooting some videos is still on my todo list, here is a photo progression of the process.  I hope it offers the needed clarity until I get around to making a video.

I also want to add here, though I name it “An easy extraction method”, easy is relative. It is also a messy and time consuming process. Be prepared to dedicate sieves, pots, pans and wooden spoons to Frankincense before you start, since cleanup is inevitable.

Gird yourself with the knowledge that metal scouring pads and Olive oil followed by warm soap and water will eventually remove both sticky and brittle resins from most kitchen utensils and appliances. (And floors). Is it worth all the work?  You betcha! You will be able to make beautiful and efficacious oils, salves and cremes for medicinal and cosmetic applications. Products that deliver the full range of therapeutic compounds found in Frankincense including AKBA and the rest of the Boswellic acids. Products that deliver much more than the essential oil of Frankincense.

I am sure there will be more questions, so feel free to leave them in the comments section below. Questions are good.

Please note, this product is not meant to be taken internally. When I feel the need to take Frankincense internally, I take 1/2 to 1 level teaspoon 2-5 times a day of powdered fresh, whole Frankincense chased with water. Powdered Frankincense in gel-caps serves a similar purpose. remember everyone is different, what works for me might not work as well for you. If you want to try this, start small and listen to your body. This is a good opportunity to mention that the essential oil of Frankincense contains little to no Boswellic acids and is not suited for internal consumption.

Here is a post showing you how to powder Frankincense-https://apothecarysgarden.com/2013/03/22/how-to-grind-frankincense-myrrh-and-other-oleo-resins/.

Making a resin extract of Frankincense with Boswellic acids

 

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Colander or sieve partially immersed in the water. The boiling water will dissolve the water-soluble gum and melt the resin from the bottom up. The gum will disperse in the water making it cloudy and the resin will float and pool on the water.

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Whole resin chunks of Boswellia Serrata in the sieve. No need to grind the resin or prep it in any way. The resin portion of Boswellia Serrata, B. carterii, B. Sacra and B. Papyrifera is mostly  Boswellic acids. As many of you know, Boswellic acids have proven to be anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer in laboratory studies and are likely the main compounds that led to Frankincense’s long traditional use as medicine. There are no Boswellic acids in the essential oil of frankincense.

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Mid process, resin is floating on the water, Gum is clouding it and the fresh resin is on its way through the sieve.

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Stirring and pressing with a wooden spoon helps move the melted resin through the sieve.

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After processing, the debris in this case is mostly bark which I like to use as an incense material. Fresh Frankincense Serrata on the lower right.

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Resin frothing and floating on the boiling water.

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Set outside to cool, the resin begins to harden.

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The morning after, the resin has hardened. Some has fallen to the bottom since its specific gravity is close to that of water. It will sink in cold water and float in hot water.

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Running it through the oven at 220 degrees C. This releases and evaporates any water that is trapped in the resin as it cooled. Though the moisture will not interfere with the making of oils, salves and cremes, I prefer to remove as much of it as I can before storing it.

 

Raw Frankincense and Resin extract of Frankincense Sacra-Both heated

Raw Frankincense on the left and Resin extract of Frankincense Sacra-Both heated to the same temperature. The lack of water-soluble gum in the extract means it will melt with heat and dissolve easily in warm oils and alcohol, while the raw resin will not.

 

Boswellia Sacra/Carterii resin extract beneath B. Papyrifera resin extrac

Solid at room temperature, the resin portions of Boswellia Thurifera beneath B. Papyrifera. Each species of Frankincense will yield a resin extract of different colour. Even variations in place  or time of harvest can influence the colour of the finished product. 

 

How to prepare an antifungal nail Lacquer with Somali Myrrh

Commiphora Myrrha, or Myrrh, well known for thousands of years for its value in perfume, incense, and medicine, has a wide range of medicinal applications in healing traditions around the world and throughout history. It is still well used in modern Western medicine, Arabian, African, European and oriental traditions.

One finds Myrrh trees growing mainly in Arabia, India and in Africa. Oddly enough,  not too far from any area that bears Frankincense trees. There is a little known, but very significant relationship between these two cousins of the Burseraceae family.

To clarify some terms from the start, even though I will call both Frankincense and Myrrh-“Oleoresins”,  they are, in reality, oleo gum resins. Myrrh contains a whopping 65% water soluble gum along with its resins and essential oils, while Frankincense species average 20%-30% water soluble gum content.

With a broad range of therapeutic  applications, Myrrh is best known for its astringent, toning, and an anti-fungal properties, and has been used traditionally for many applications where fungi have skirted our body’s natural defenses and taken root.

Though the Arabian and African Myrrh species are biologically identical, they differ from each other visually and to a small degree in their fragrance. To the best of my knowledge, they both serve equally well, and share the same medicinal qualities. Arabian Myrrh is darker and often coarser visually, collected in larger lumps than African material, while African Myrrh has a slightly less pungent, more delicate fragrance than Arabian Myrrh.

Arabian Myrrh-Commiphora Myrrha

Fresh dark Arabian Myrrh. A powerful anti-fungal, astringent and traditional medicine for thousands of years.

Since mushrooms, fungi and most molds require a moist environment to flourish, it is no surprise that Moon-Ruled Myrrh, with its natural affinity with our body’s fluid systems and ability to regulate, balance and tone them, would be an excellent choice to restore the body’s natural balance and eliminate moisture loving Fungi.

Hesiod derives Aphrodite from aphrós

An ancient Roman fresco-Hesiod derives Aphrodite from aphrós “foam,” interpreting the name as “risen from the foam”

The root of the name Myrrh, Mor/Mar/מר, comes to us from ancient Aramaic and means “Bitter. This root word is thought to be the source of the name Mary, in Hebrew and Arabic,  Miryam, Maryam, מרים, which translates into “bitterness” or froth of the sea with strong and ancient associations with the universal feminine principle, ancient Goddesses such as Ashtoreth, Astarte, Aphrodite,and of course the Moon and its influence on the ebb, flow and tide of waters both within and without us.  As a point of interest, Frankincense and all its species are ruled Astrologically by the Sun. These astrological assignments are no coincidence, but an indication of how this healing duo works within our bodies.

When it comes to fungi, Myrrh is used to address a variety of conditions. In a saline mouthwash, the tincture of Myrrh is used  for thrush, (oral candidiasis), in a tea, via infusion or tincture it helps treat candida and other fungi in the digestive tract, as a 1:5-96% alcohol tincture it is a treatment for Tinea type fungal infections such as “Ringworm“, (not a worm, but a colony of Fungi),  Athletes foot and “Jock itch“, caused by various dermatophytes, fungi/molds that feed off dead skin cells on moist areas of the skin. Less known, but equally effective, Myrrh oleoresin is used in the preparation of a nail “Lacquer” which is applied to toe and fingernail fungal infections, or onychomycosis, (which means nail fungus growth, infestation or proliferation in Latin).

Interestingly, but not surprising, in the “Doctrine of  Signatures“, an ancient technology and method of understanding the language of plants, their affinities and uses, one of the identifying visual markers of Commiphora Myrrha is the presence of layers that resemble fingernails when a piece is snapped into two. Though not all pieces of Myrrh respond this way, many larger pieces do.

Fragrant Ethiopian Myrrh. For oral care, perfume and incense.

Fragrant Somali Myrrh. For oral care, perfume and incense.

Somali and Ethiopian varieties of Commiphora Myrrha lend themselves well to this type of product since they are of a lighter and less obtrusive colour which will transfer to the nails with this treatment. Feeling self-conscious about the state and appearance of one’s nails can add stress when dealing with nail fungi and the accompanying infection that is usually present. These lighter coloured species will not compound the look of damage as a darker Myrrh does. Once applied the lacquer will harden as the solvent, in this case alcohol, which also acts as an antibacterial and drying agent, evaporates and leaves the Myrrh behind to address the fungi.

A similar remedy for nail Fungi is used traditionally in Northern Europe where Spruce sap is the active anti-fungal and anti-bacterial agent,  Though the resins are a key component, the essential oils of both Spruce and Myrrh are proven to have antibacterial and anti-microbial properties which make them ideal for addressing the infections that are often associated with the fungus as it develops and intrenches deeper into surrounding tissue.

Here are intructions for a “Lacquer” to address and help eliminate nail fungus. It needs to be applied at least once daily for as long as it takes to completely free the area of fungus. Steps should be taken to correct the contributing factors that ushered in the fungus and made the area susceptible to it.  These contributing factors can include, boosting the immune system through proper diet and nourishment, keeping the affected areas well-ventilated and dry. Results will take time so give it a couple of weeks at least to see if the treatment is working for you. Before and after photos can help discern improvement when the results may often be slow to manifest in a well established fungal infection.

Myrrh has been used as a liquid application to address ringworm and”Jock itch”. For these applications, one would make a thinner and less concentrated tincture, such as 1 part Myrrh to 5 parts 96% alcohol. To make a product that would address these skin related fungi, follow the instructions below and change the ratio of Myrrh to alcohol to 50 grams Myrrh, and 250 grams 96% alcohol.

Myrrh oleo-gum-resin

Myrrh oleo-gum-resin

How to make a Myrrh Lacquer for fungal infections of the toe or fingernails and a treatment for Ringworm and other Tinea.

  •  Take 50 Grams of Fresh Somali or Ethiopian Myrrh, (darker Arabian Myrrh will work just as well, but will leave a darker stain on the nails and cuticles).
  • 150 grams of 96% grain alcohol.
  •  Grind the Myrrh as fine as you can using a mortar and pestle, a coffee/herb grinder or a combination of both. See the post How to grind Frankincense and Myrrh for instructions and tips.
  • Put the finely ground Myrrh in a resealable 1/2 to1-liter, wide-mouthed jar and add to it all the alcohol.
  •  Oleoresin tinctures such as this tend to get a thin layer of alcohol/oleoresin mix in the thread of the jar. When the alcohol evaporates it leaves behind a tenacious glue and can make opening the jar a challenge for the strongest of us. Even a drop of tincture will quickly spread along the thread through capillary action and form a permanent bond. Applying a very small amount of vegetable oil with one’s finger, to the thread of the glass jar while avoiding the lip, counters this problem elegantly.
  • Stir, shake, (when jar is closed and well sealed!), till the alcohol and the oleoresin powder are completely and evenly mixed and none of the Myrrh is floating on top of the alcohol.
  •  Place in a relatively warm place such as on top of a fridge, water heater or furnace.
  •  Leave to macerate for 6 to 10 weeks stirring or shaking daily in such a way that all the resin breaks up and there are no clumps, and no sediment accumulating or sticking to the bottom of the jar.
  •  I most often start my tinctures at the New Moon and filter them 6 or 10 weeks later at the full Moon if they seem done. I find working with the natural cycles, the ebb and flow of Nature and its rhythms improves the quality of my products. Since Myrrh is “Ruled” by the Moon and the sign of Cancer in traditional astrology, initiating the  tincturing process at a time when the Moon or Sun are in the sign of Cancer or in a water sign, harmonizes, compounds and potentises the tincture with its own inherent characteristic energies….  Though this Astrological approach is not absolutely necessary, and your lacquer will likely work quite well without it, it is an ideal opportunity to explore the energetic and esoteric side of plants and herbalism and expand your plant wisdom, which is gained through personal study,  experience, and exploration.  If you would like to learn more about the Astrological approach to plant medicine, you will find some information on Medical Astrology and working with the rhythms of the stars and planets here in my section on Astrodynamics).
  • When the colour of this tincture is no longer changing, (6 weeks or so), pour it through a fine filter such as the corner of a pillowcase, a piece of cotton sheet or a paper filter. Paper coffee filters can often work well for alcohol tinctures. You can do this through a funnel into a clean and resealable jar.
  • Your product will likely sediment a bit while it is standing undisturbed. The clear liquid can be poured or siphoned off and separated if you like. This will eliminate any grittiness to your lacquer when it is dry.
  •  Mark your final jar with the date and any other information pertinent to this product..
  • If you like, you can pour your lacquer into a smaller closable bottle that is easy to access and has a neck wide enough to insert a paintbrush. Remember the trick of applying a little oil, (or vaseline), to the thread of your bottle to avoid future frustration and difficulties. A clean, empty nail-polish bottle with brush in cap can offer a functional and pleasing container for your lacquer.
  •   Otherwise, take a small clean and dry paintbrush, 1/2 to 1 centimeter in width or so, dip it into the liquid and proceed to apply it liberally to the nails and any area that is affected by the fungus or infection. Overpainting the area a bit is OK. Disposable cotton swabs can be used if they do not catch on rough spots and leave fibers behind, the same goes for using the corner of a sponge, you can improvise with disposable applicators.
  • If you choose to reuse a paint brush, dip it in clean alcohol afterward and dry it well with a piece of paper towel to avoid your brush solidifying with dry lacquer.
  • Keep the bottle closed tight and apply the lacquer at least once a day if not twice a day.
  • If no results are evident after 2 weeks, seek another course of action.
Assorted tinctures, digesting

Assorted tinctures, digesting

A cheat and shortcut to making your own lacquer is to dissolve essential oil of Myrrh in alcohol and use this on your nails. I don’t recommend this approach unless you absolutely can’t make the whole tincture. Though it may contribute and help eliminate the fungus, it does not contain Myrrh’s full spectrum of therapeutic compounds without including the resin portion which is absent in the essential oil. It is this resin of the Myrrh that forms the harder and less permeable “Lacquer” on the nails. Using the essential oil without the resin will leave a stickier and less resilient layer, though it will no doubt bring some of the healing and antifungal properties of Myrrh to the area.

For those who choose to not use alcohol in their practices, the following recipe may be effective. I have not tried it personally, but it should work equally well when alcohol is not an option.

Use the following instructions for extracting the resin and essential oils of Frankincense using water.“Tapping into Frankincense and its Boswellic acids, an easy extraction method” . Replace Frankincense in the instructions with Myrrh. Keep in mind that since Myrrh contains 65% water soluble gum, you will be left with only 30% to 35% of the material you started with after removing the gum and extraneous material such as bark and stones.

Once the water soluble gum is removed, the resulting pure oleoresin can be dissolved easily in a vegetable oil of your choice at a ratio of 1:3 resin to oil, it can then be applied to the nails as described above.

For instructions and important tips to dissolve your pure oleoresin in oil, please see the post-“Make a Frankincense resin oil with Boswellic acids”. Again, simply replace Frankincense with Myrrh in the instructions.

Any feedback in the comments section would be greatly appreciated and add to the knowledge base of all those who will read this post and try this recipe for their own issues with nail fungus.

And,,,,remember to always take clear notes of your work.

Your future self will thank you!

Dan

Frankincense & Myrrh, a Theory on Holistic Tinctures

A Thought on the holistic tincturing of oleo-resins.

Each type of Oleo-Gum-Resin such as Myrrh, Opoponax, Mastic, the many types of Frankincense etc., contain different proportions of water-soluble gum and alcohol soluble oleo-resins, (resins and volatile oils).

I propose that when one of these Oleo-gum-resins is tinctured to extract its medicinal constituents and properties, that the 2 solvents used for tincturing, be in the same ratio to each other, as the ratio of gum to oleo-resins in the material being tinctured.

Frankincense, Boswellia Papyrifera 60 grams. An oleo-gum-resin

Frankincense, Boswellia Papyrifera 60 grams. An oleo-gum-resin. Has a different percentage of gum to resin than Boswellia Rivae.

In a traditional medicinal, water/alcohol tincture, the gums are dissolved by the water, the oleo resins by the ethanol,(alcohol). What is left over after this extraction is mainly bark and other insoluble extraneous organic material. (Spagyric tinctures often put this to good use). The point of tincturing is to extract as much of the soluble active medicinal components as possible. Ideally exhausting the material by transferring all its chemical constituents to the medicine, while preserving any preexisting synergistic effects between them.

Considering that all parts of these natural Oleo-Gum-Resin exudates, (saps), contain valuable chemical constituents and compounds, and if there is no reason to isolate or change the natural composition of the material, it would  be a more efficacious  medicine if preserved as close to its natural state as possible

Myrrh tree, Myrrh Oleo-Resin, Ogaden region of Ethiopia. Photo courtesy of Ermias Dagne

Myrrh tree, Myrrh Oleo-Resin, Ogaden region of Ethiopia. Photo courtesy of Ermias Dagne

I propose that the best way to create a water/alcohol tincture that is true to its source material, is by using the same ratio of water to ethanol as the plant material exhibits in its ratio of gum to oleo-resin. That this is the only way to accurately migrate  the whole material authentically, with its inherent medicinal potency, and any “synergy” that is naturally present in the original material.

Boswellia, Frankincense Papyrifera. Gum, Resin and volatile oils.

“Solve'” applied to Boswellia Papyrifera. The triad is separated into its 3 components. Gum(on right), Resin, (on left), in solution, and essential oil. (Not in  their naturally occurring proportions ).

Thus, if a sample of Myrrh oleo-gum-resin contains 60% gum and 40% oleo-resins, and a Tincture was made using 100% ethanol, it would only extract the resins and volatile oils. It would have a negligible amount of water-soluble gum. Certainly nothing close to the gum to oleo-resin proportions found in the original material. One would assume this extraction would not offer the same medicinal effects as the whole oleo-gum-resin. 1- Because the water-soluble gum contains   chemical constituents that have medicinal value on their own. And 2- because whatever effects the synergy of the whole material had in its natural form, would be lost.

Myrrh is a common resin in the Horn of Africa.

Myrrh is a common resin in the Horn of Africa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

According to this method, a solvent mix composed of 20% alcohol and 80% water would not extract a tincture that was representative of the original material either. Rather it would contain more gum than oleo-resins than the original Myrrh. The same could be said of any other combination of these two solvents other than a combination of water to alcohol that reflected as closely as possible the actual proportions of gum to oleo-resin found in the material tinctured.

Some types of Frankincense contain very little gum, such as Boswellia Frereana.  As low as 0. 5%-0.1%, see AritiHerbal table of Extractability of Boswellia Resin. Other types of Frankincense have greater proportions of gum to oleo-resin. According to this theory of holistic tincturing,  the unique qualities inherent in each oleo-gum-resin, can only be  reproduced in a tincture if the natural ratio of gum to oleo resin in the source material is reflected accurately in the ratio of water to alcohol in the tincturing solvent. One could assume it would keep the same natural synergy in the original material intact by keeping all the chemical constituents in the same relative proportion to each other in the finished product or tincture.

Boswellia, Frankincense Frereana. Called Yeminite chewing gum.

Containing almost no water-soluble gum, Frankincense Frereana does not dissolve when masticated, for this reason it is used as a chewing gum and can be purchased under the name “Yemenite chewing gum”. It is composed mainly of resin and essential oils.

I am not a trained scientist, nor do I have access to the instruments that would put this theory of holistic tincturing to the test.  I don’t know if this makes sense to anyone besides myself, or if there is any corroborating research out there to support this theory, but I would Love to hear any opinions, conflicting or supporting.

Dan

As an addendum ,( written a month or two after this post), I need to add that after thought, contemplation, examination and the occasional dream, I realize there may be one other way to extract all of the essential oils, resin and gum from these oleo-gum resins. The one way they could be extracted in their entirety and with their naturally occurring proportions intact, without a knowledge of their inherent gum-resin-oil ratios is, If  a “disproportionately large” amount of alcohol/water is used for the extraction. So instead of making a 1:5 or 1:6 tincture with 1 being the oleo-gum-resin, something like a 1:10 tincture could be prepared. using much more water than the quantity of gum required, and much more alcohol than the oleo-resin required. In this way all the components could be extracted. However…the obvious drawback, is that there would be a much higher quantity of liquid and a lower proportion of oleo-gum-resin. So it can be done, but with a price. In a way, cheating a bit. This 1:10 ratio tincture, though containing all the soluble and desired parts of the material, would be very weak, which is not ideal and I see no finesse, or advantage to it. It would be very very difficult, if even possible, to remove the excess solvents without losing some of the volatile oils.

Since I am on the topic I will take this opportunity to raise a point that I will address in greater detail  in a future post. Lately there has been a lot of talk about the healing properties of Boswellic acid found in Boswellia Sacra. Though much important research has been done on the different types of Frankincense, and Boswellic acid does show great promise as an anti-inflammatory and antitumor, among other important applications,  it is not a volatile  or essential oil . Which means little, if any Boswellic acid is found in the essential oil of Boswellia Sacra/Carterii.  Whatever Boswellic acid is present in the oleo-gum-resins of some of the members of the Boswellia family, resides  in the resin part, not in the “Oil”, and is not normally extracted with the essential oils. If a  company claims that its essential oil of Frankincense Sacra has a “high percentage  of Boswellic acid, then one should ask, how did it get there??

Food for thought.

Dan

Distilling Frankincense essential oil

Continuing to work on a Frankincense anti aging/wrinkle crème and a Frankincense rejuvenating mask from the (post distillation) gum and resin residue of different types of Frankincense. Here I am distilling the essential oils from Frankincense, Boswellia species.

Successful formulation of a Frankincense Anti-Aging creme, utilizing the healing properties of the Frankincense gum and resin.

Successful formulation of a Frankincense Anti-Aging creme, utilizing the healing properties of the Frankincense gum and resin. Much more than just an essential oil.

By “post distillation” I mean that after distilling off the essential oils, what I am left with are the water-soluble gum and alcohol-soluble resin.
Since essential oils can irritate the skin, especially of the face, post distillation allows me to add a controlled amount of essential oils of my choice, isolate the water-soluble gums from the alcohol-soluble resins and remove all extraneous materials from them.

The method for distillation is steam/hydro distillation using a simple home-made pot still.

Home made pot still charged with fresh Frankincense, Boswellia Papyrifera from Ethiopia.

Home made pot still charged with fresh Frankincense from Ethiopia.

  The oleo-gum-resin for this distillation is Frankincense from Ethiopia. Because this is an experiment I only used 2 kg. of resin. Much less than this still can process.
The ratio of essential oils in each type of Frankincense varies greatly. One can collect  anywhere from 10 ml. up to 60 ml. or more from 2 kg. of raw oleo-gum-resin.

The sieve keeps the resin from sitting on the bottom of the pot where it could burn. If the resin did get burned, even slightly, the fragrance of all the components would be affected, making resin, gum, oil and residue in the still, unusable for any purpose whatsoever and no way to reclaim them or separate the burnt odor from them. In fact, on top of the loss of the material, the whole still, including over 8 feet of air-cooled copper condenser would have to be scrubbed and practically sterilized to make sure there was not the slightest remnant of burnt residue or odor in the whole distillation train. I shudder at the thought!!! I had already done this twice prior to distilling the Frankincense just the day before. First removing traces of the last essential I had distilled, then had to do it all over again because I could smell hints of cleaning products in the condenser when I turned up the heat and started the distillation process.

       The lesson here, I believe, is that there are benefits to using standard glass water cooled condensers. I love the fact that this one utilizes air and consumes no resources to function. But it has its drawbacks.

This is a photo of the resin after distilling. Note the change in colour and texture. A pool of gum has settled at the bottom of the sieve, trying to drip into the pot through resin clogged sieve holes. Also note the milky white colour of the water after it has dissolved some of the the water soluble gums.

Home made pot Still. Frankincense resin suspended in sieve to avoid burning.

Home made pot Still. Frankincense resin suspended in sieve to avoid burning.

Frankincense water soluble gum mixed with distillation water in the still

Frankincense water soluble gum mixed with distillation water in the still has coloured the water a milky white.

Now that the essential oil is distilled from the oleo-gum-resin, most of the resin is in the basket. Except for some that dripped through the sieve and formed the tastiest looking layer of caramel coloured resin on the bottom of the pot.The water in the pot is white from dissolved gum. What remains is to separate the rest of the gum from the resin, (using water as the solvent), then remove all extraneous materials, pieces of bark, stone, sand etc., and purify the components.

Frankincense, Boswellia Papyrifera resin from bottom of still

Frankincense, Boswellia resin from bottom of still. Looks good enough to eat!!

 

When gum and resin are separated and purified they will be recombined in an emulsion with the addition of  emollient and skin nourishing oils, antioxidants, and a small amount of broad spectrum preservative.

Even though the prototypes and first formulas seem to have kept well for months without obvious spoilage or mold.  And even though i have a deep respect for the preserving qualities of tree oleo resins. I can’t take the chance of bacteria or other organisms growing after making an oil/water emulsion.

Frankincense, Boswellia Rivae, post distillation of essential oils. Only gum and resins remain to be separated and cleaned. Then recombined and reformulated for skin care and healing products.

A different type of Frankincense, post distillation of essential oils. Only gum and resins remain to be separated and cleaned. Then recombined and reformulated for skin care and healing products.

Home made pot Still. Used to distill essential oils, wines and much more. Note it is made of everything including parts of the kitchen sink.

Home made pot Still. Used to distill essential oils, wines and much more. Note it is made of everything including parts of the kitchen sink, with a salvaged copper/Aluminum heat exchange as an air cooled condenser..

Distilled Frankincense essential oil. Boswellia Rivea. 2013, Home made still.

Distilled Frankincense essential oil. Boswellia Rivea. 2013.

Bitter Myrrh, Libra Moon, a Tincture

FULL MOON IN LIBRA

Ruled astrologically by the Moon, as some other bitter plants, it is time to tincture Myrrh. Today’s full moon in Libra, is closest to the spring equinox and appropriately, represents equilibrium and balance. The symbol for Libra are the scales. Its keyword is Balance. Balance between male and female energies. Winter and Summer. inner and outer, self and other.  As the sun and the seasons progress with Aries passion towards another Solstice, new beginnings, renewed direction, goals and ambitions are in the air, with a timely reminder to temper our actions and reactions, with balance. Sometimes easy to forget when swept up in Spring projects and passions.

Anatomical Man in the Duke Berry's Très Riches...

Anatomical Man in the Duke Berry’s Très Riches Heures (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I love the way the full moons are always poised against, and illuminated by their opposite Sun sign. A perfect balance of friction and attraction. A choreographed dance of opposites made in heaven.    Aries Sun and its opposite, Libra Moon. The Moon’s feminine and watery reflective ebb and flow, contrasting the direct intensity of the Sun, especially when in  fiery Aries, makes them a  dynamic match of opposites.

.”The spark is Netzach, the friction of life.   In a motor, this generates the engine.   Netzach is Nature, the Tree of Life’s power base.   The friction of lightning and rain in Earth’s aeons, generated life.  The friction of male and female re-kindles the soul, a lamp in the womb for the soul.” http://janeaquariel.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/solomon/

Now is the time. It has built up for weeks. Thinking, pondering, planning, waiting, distilling water, preparing. Waiting… Writing …..  In the fridge it waited as per my earlier post of how to grind resins. It is appropriate that it come out of the cold of the fridge (Frig, Frigga) /winter to spin around, be ground to nondescript powder. Then, in the bright of the full Libra Moon and the waxing warm Sun, dissolves into the waters of life, (Aqua Vitae), like the salt of the sea, becoming one with the liquid, and turned into a tincture. Losing itself into the menstruum. Transformation. This is the time, for the Alchemical “Solve’ “, the first step in the process.

Beautifully formed Myrrh resin chunk

Beautifully formed Myrrh resin chunk

Myrrh,( Mor, Hebrew), Mar,(Hebrew, bitter), , Mar Yam, (Mariam, Miriam, Mary, Maria),                               Mar Yam-(,Hebrew Bitter of the sea), or froth of the sea, salt of the sea, perhaps also known as Ashtoreth, Astarte, Ostara. Shechinah. The Holy Consort and feminine counterpart to YHWH. Feminine principles of the Moon and element of water.

English: Astarte with horned (moon crescent) crown

English: Astarte with horned (moon crescent) crown (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Seems today is my , Ostara ,Easter and Passover. At 05:27 AM this morning, I covered the finely ground, powdered brown bitterness of Myrrh with the menstruum.  Pondering while nibbling on the Myrrh as I work, it is SO bitter! Grinding and thinking about the Passover Seder. It always felt like a bit of a sham with no one around that could give an answer that “rang” with Truth of deeper meanings for the traditional symbols. Mostly receiving information that no one has actually understood, or personally stood under in decades.  The representative “bitter” element or “Maror”, on the Seder platter now days is Horseradish, and not bitter in any way. Pungent? Yes. Bitter? No. In fact the “Maror” (the “bitter herb), may well have been and more likely was,” Mar”(, Hebrew-Bitter), and “Mor” ,(Hebrew-Myrrh), so (MARMOR?), Maror? My feeling is that Myrrh is likely the original basis of the original Passover Maror.

I can think of nothing that represents palatable bitterness as perfectly as Myrrh, which was readily available for thousands of years in ancient Israel.  Also Interesting is the inclusion in the Seder platter of salt water as “the tears we shed as slaves”, (The above mentioned froth of the sea/Moon reference). The lambs shank bone, a symbol of a tender young Aries Ram Sun?  The “Karpas” or greens, a symbol of spring growth. The egg on the platter at the Seder, fertility and Spring, but also representative of the duality and union of Yin and Yang, Equinox/Balance, Yolk as Sun, White as moon, (“Ha Levanah”, or the “White one”, is the Hebrew word for “The Moon”). Moon Feminine and Yin embracing and receiving  the Sun and Yang principal, the yolk.

Deutsch: Yin Yang

Deutsch: Yin Yang (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is a time for new beginnings, rebirth, regardless of one’s faith. A time when we might have more impetus to try, and succeed. To emancipate ourselves from forms of slavery we laboured under till now. Whether self-created and self-defeating patterns and habits, or unhealthy dynamics we have perpetuated with others. Patterns we have accepted and tolerated to our detriment for too long for all the wrong reasons. Libra seems to imply the dynamics between ourselves and others. Relationships.  Our Easter, Ostara, Passover ,Equinox passage is an opportunity  for both reflection and action. Self-examination, new choices, new beginnings. A time we might see our light reflected back to us, and a time for us, like the Sun, to wax bright.  With any luck we can hope to ride this wave of seasonal growth, and work with the natural cycles around and within us to carry ourselves closer to our goals..

And all the while, try to remember, balance.

Moses, Exodus, Liberation of the bondservants,...

Moses, Exodus, Liberation of the bondservants, the Jews in Egypt go free, Holy Bible Etching, 1885 (Photo credit: Wonderlane)

The Myrrh Tincture:   Created at 05:27 EST. During the Pisces Lunation cycle, Full Moon in Libra, Sun in Aries. Ascendant in Taurus?   A solvent mix of 55% distilled water to 45% pure alcohol, (mirroring the assumed ratio of gum to oleo-resin in the Myrrh), was poured  and covered the powdered Myrrh. It basked in the predawn moonlight symbolically, and was put away to gestate and circulate. Left in the care of natures rhythms till it is time for me to step in and give Nature a little help. Take the tincture to the next level. Likely on the path to becoming a Spagyric tincture.